Things That Not All Programmers Know #1: Cyclic Inheritance

It has been a month since launching Significant Insignificance last October. Before anything I would like to thank everyone who cared enough to visit my blog and read what may seem to others nothing but insignificant thoughts. I hope you enjoyed reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it and promise more of the same.

Today, I decided to add a new series to my blog: “Things That Not All Programmers Know”. To make sure that I always write technical posts, on the first day of every month, I am going to post something (a trick, a tip, a best practice) related to programming that I believe not many young programmers know. This way, everyone- including me- gets to learn something new.

I am going to start this series with something relatively easy: Cyclic Inheritance. First, the definition:

If a class or interface inherits from itself, even directly (i.e., it appears as its super-class or in its list of super-interfaces) or indirectly (i.e., one of its super-class or one of its super-interfaces inherits from it), a cyclic inheritance error is reported.

Ok, this needs an example, consider the following code:

When trying to compile it, you get the error: “cyclic inheritance involving Person“.

This is cyclic inheritance; each class inherits the other: Employee is the subclass of Person, and Person is the subclass of Employee. This relationship is not possible.

Cyclic inheritance can be solved by determining the proper relationship; that is, finding out the right super class and the subclass. In the previous example, Person is the super class, so it should not try to inherit Employee and Employee is the subclass which will inherit Person. Correction is removing “extends Employee” from the Person class signature:

Hope this was useful. If you know any unique programming trick (Java or others) that you believe not many people know, do not hesitate to contact me. And again, for everyone who followed my blog throughout the previous month, thanks a lot for your dedication. This blog would not be alive if it weren’t for your support. Thank you.

Advertisements