Reviewing TEDxCairo 2011 Talks – Part I

TED, short for Technology, Entertainment, Design, is a global set of conferences held to promote “Ideas Worth Spreading” by bringing the most interesting thought leaders to give an inspiring talk in 18 minutes or less. TEDx is a program designed to give communities, organizations, and individuals the opportunity to stimulate dialogue through TED-like experiences at a locally organized, planned, and coordinated event.

I was privileged to receive an invitation to attend TEDxCairo 2011 on May 21st. In this four-part post, I will be reviewing the talks of the event from a TED Talks (big) fan point of view. In my opinion, a TED talk should be evaluated according to how successful it was in fulfilling the following criteria:

  1. The talk is about Technology, Entertainment, and/or Design
  2. The audience WILL be touched, moved, and/or inspired

That, and how the talk compares to/how likely it is to be added to the talks featured on the TEDTalks web page.

The theme of TEDxCairo 2011 was “Resurrection: Laughs, Tears and Hopes”. As a whole, the speakers and the talks were extremely successful in conveying the laughs, tears and hopes feelings. However, if you dissect and rate them individually, the talks and performances would be ranging between outstanding, good, bad, and plain ugly.

MC:

Upon hearing that Reem Maged- the recently-famous TV presenter- would be the MC (Master of Ceremonies) of the event, I became skeptic. I was not completely sure that she would be able to pull off good intros/outros, especially that when she hosted the TEDxCairo co-founders on her TV show, it seemed that she did not know much about the TED/TEDx concepts.

Unfortunately I was right. She was NOT a good MC. She did not introduce TED and TEDx good enough, her introduction of the speakers did not seem well-prepared, and her after-talk jokes and remarks were just off. The only thing she did well was keeping the “overly excited” Tarek Shalaby on a leash during the interview that should not have happened in the first place. But I will get to that later.

Verdict: Reem Maged Hosting: Bad.

Mohamed Abdel-Mottaleb: What Newton Didn’t See Coming:

The first talk was by the founder and director of the Nano Materials Masters Program at Nile University and the forefront figure of Nanotechnology in the Middle East Asst. Prof. Mohamed Abdel-Mottaleb. His talk revolved around Nanotechnology; its effects on other fields of science and the endless possibilities provided by embracing it.

Needless to say, the talk was full of information; too much information, to the extent that it became very difficult to follow him, leading to the whole thing becoming incoherent. Now, the talk itself was really good, what I have a problem with is selecting it to be the first talk. In my opinion, you need something light and catchy to start a TEDx event with, and then work your way up to the heavily-informative talks. If this talk was scheduled to be at mid-day for example, it would have caught much more attention than it did.

Verdict: What Newton Didn’t See Coming: Good.

Gihane Zaki: Primeval Ocean:

The second talk was by Egyptology professor Gihane Zaki. She captured the audience attention by mentioning a revolution in Egypt around the year 2011 BC when a king ruled ancient Egypt for 94 years and his son succeeded him but reigned only one for year before getting murdered. She also spoke of the ancient Egyptian belief in the circle of life and how our revolution in 2011 was part of that cycle.

The talk was very interesting and informative. The thing is, though, according to Wikipedia, the information she presented was not very accurate. But some experts say that the information on Wikipedia is generally not very accurate. So I am giving Prof. Gihane the benefit of the doubt!

Verdict: Primeval Ocean: Good.

Ali Faramawy: Top Ten “Belmasry”:

Next was Ali Faramawy; VP of Microsoft International. Upon getting on the stage, Ali declared that he does not have a “PowerPoint” (Microsoft ad anyone? :D) or use any “Tofa7” (apples)- referring to the Apple Mac on the stage! His talk covered the feelings of Egyptians before, during, and after the Jan 25 revolution, and how the feelings before the revolution (amnesia, uncertainty, and fear) are the same now, but for different reasons. He also stressed on the importance of communicating with the Egyptians abroad and benefit from what they can give to their country.

I really liked that talk. It was light, funny, informative, and inspiring without being overly “touchy-feely”. In my opinion, this should have been the first talk on the agenda. The only thing that I did not like was that he was mostly reading from papers. Not a nice thing to do when giving a TED talk..

Verdict: Top Ten “Belamsry”: Good.

Fadel Soliamn: Bread and Salt:

Fadel Soliman is an international Islam speaker and evangelist (why are we hearing about these people for the first time?) He is also the director of the Bridges Foundation; specialized in presenting and training speakers on how to present Islam. Fadel’s talk was mainly about the commonalities between Egyptian Muslims and Christians, and how the unity in Tahrir square during the Jan 25 revolution “The Republic of Tahrir” was an integral part of its success. He also stressed on the fact that the word “Copt” does NOT mean Christian, but rather an Egyptian.

This was definitely one of the best talks on the event. Fadel had a charm to him that it was really difficult not to give him your full attention. The talk itself was interesting, insightful, inspiring, and had a strong message all while being light and witty. An excellent example of how a TED talk should be like.

Verdict: Bread and Salt: Outstanding!

Mena Shenoda: An Egyptian Tale:

The last talk of the first session was by Mena Shenoda, co-author of the bestseller “Astigmatism in the Brain”; a book that collects a set of tales about the sectarian disputes in Egypt. His talk (apparently) was a narration of one of the tales mentioned in the book.

In my opinion, this was not only the worst talk at the event; it was the worst TED talk I have ever seen. The story was supposed to be touching, but the overly-theatrical, overacting style of Mena that was closer to a Lady Gaga performance than a touching narration of an inspiring story diverted everyone’s attention from the story and did not leave the best of impressions about the speaker. A massive fail.

Verdict: An Egyptian Tale: Plain ugly.

The first session ended with Fadel Soliman as its star, Ali Faramawy leaving a great impression, and the people splitting in their opinion on the talks of Gihane and Abdel-Mottaleb.

Thanks for reading so far, part 2 coming very soon.

(Photography by Ahmed Naguib)

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One Response to Reviewing TEDxCairo 2011 Talks – Part I

  1. melmorsy says:

    Perfect and to the point review (Y)

    Truth be told, only the last sentence of Shenoda’s story was outstanding:
    : “علي وبيتر شخص واحد، لما بيتر حب يزق علي برا الشباك، زق الهوا .. بيتر وقع مات” -مينا شنودة #tedxcairo

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